Alpine

My job, in the ten hundred most used words

When people become old and can't do their job any more, they still need money. Sometimes the job they have done will help them by giving them money when they are old.

But how does the job know how much money they need to save, to pay the old people? That's where I come in - I work out how much they need, and help them deal with any problems they have in doing this.
Alpine

Cheering news

We Will Wok You is available from the UK version of Amazon. Admittedly in limited numbers, but nonetheless available. (http://www.amazon.co.uk/will-Wok-you-German-Version/dp/B006WY1OKS)

In other news, Gigamic are apparently going to publish a French-language only edition of We Will Wok You. And publish a version of Keyflower with French rules. (According to a press release they put out. I haven't heard any of this officially, though, so I may be getting the wrong end of the stick somehow.)

Awesome :-)
Alpine

(no subject)

Dear Police and Crime Commissioner candidate,

Searching on the internet, it seems that the main way in which you're attempting to convince me that you're the best person for the job, to persuade you to give me your vote, is through your statement on http://www.choosemypcc.org.uk/.

I would therefore expect you to seize the opportunity to convince me - to talk about your history, who you are as a person, what you will bring to the job. To craft a statement sketches your aspirations for change, and convinces me of your competence to carry this through. Instead I've found that you couldn't be bothered to do that, and got someone else to ghost write it for you.

Currently, I'm more inclined to vote for the ghost writers than you. They, at least, have shown they can create something vaguely persuasive. You have not.

Best wishes for the future (except for this ballot where I hope you do badly),

Angoel
Alpine

(no subject)

I'm back from a magnificent time at the games fair in Essen. I had two games released there - Keyflower from R&D Games and We Will Wok You from Pegasus - and both were well received. (Keyflower especially so - in the Fairplay list, showing rankings of new games based on people's votes, Keyflower spent much of the show jostling for first place.) The game Snowdonia, released by my friends in Surprised Stare Games, also seems to have gone down very well.

On the unpublished side, things were also good, with a number of useful meetings with publishers, a number of prototypes given to interested parties and a number of further games ideas had (although when I'll have time to implement them is as yet unclear).

Great though Essen was, I must admit to relief that it's all over. The last few months have not been easy - eeking out moments to revise rules, prepare prototypes and plan meetings - usually when should have been asleep. And Essen itself, although great fun, relied principally by a mixture of nerves and adrenaline to keep me upright. It's been magnificent. But I'm also looking forwards to the routine of normal life.
Alpine

(no subject)

I'm now back from the Olympic Stadium, having watched my sister (Julia Bleasdale) come 8th in the 10,000m with a time of 30:55.63. In doing so, she knocked 34 seconds off her personal best and is now sitting third in the UK time list for the women's 10,000m (position 2 being taken by Jo Pavey in the same race, and position 1 being comfortably held by Paula Radcliffe).

It was an increadible experience watching her and I'm immensely proud.

I'm also feeling inexplicably shattered, given how little I did beyond feeling nervous and shouting at her to keep going. I think I might head back to bed.
Alpine

(no subject)

Today I'm going to go to the Olympic stadium and watch my sister run in the 10,000m finals. The race is at 9:25pm and I'm already nervous.

*bounce*
Alpine

On The Cards

As you may know, I've had another game published. It's called On The Cards (Boardgamegeek link), and consists of a standard deck of 52 cards, and 52 rules cards with rules for traditional card games split across five different types (Deal, Aim, Card Play, Trick Taking and Optional Twist). The rules cards have been constructed so that any four cards of the basic rules types will give you a different card game.

The main game has you setting out a random game and playing a round. When that is complete, the players who have won most (or lost fewest) points take one of the rules cards to show their victory, giving a new game for the next round. Play continues until someone has won four rules cards.

If you've read this description, and a cross between Fluxx and Bridge doesn't appeal, that's fair enough. On The Cards tends to polarise people into those who love it and those who can't see the point, and you're likely to be in the latter camp.

If, on the other hand, you're thinking 'that sounds fascinating', you can get a copy from the publishers at Surprised Stare Games, or directly from me if you know you're going to see me and want to save the postage. Or if you want to ask questions, please feel free to leave a comment below.
Alpine

(no subject)

As a fast reader, I rarely give up on books - it's usually simpler to plough my way through to the end. However, I'm making an exception for 'Great Expectations', because it's depiction of Pip's attempts to achieve his life goal of being a useless parasite are so banal that it was sapping my will to live. It didn't help that Pip's primary means of teaching his ambitions was to mope about aimlessly, failing to engage with crudely drawn caricatures that comprised the other characters.
Alpine

(no subject)

I think that I haven't seen people enough recently, need a kick in the backside to get me to do something about it. Ergo, a poll:

Poll #1759601 We should meet up

How should we meet up?

I should visit you
3(30.0%)
You should visit me
3(30.0%)
We both should meet up somewhere else
4(40.0%)

When should we meet?

July
0(0.0%)
August
4(30.8%)
September
2(15.4%)
October
2(15.4%)
November
2(15.4%)
December
2(15.4%)
Next year some time...
1(7.7%)

If I don't knot where you live, or you think we should meet somewhere else, where's that?